Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018) Review

You’d think that after Avengers: Infinity War any Marvel movie that doesn’t follow up the events in that movie would just automatically suck.

Well you’d be wrong. So happily wrong.

Ant-Man and the Wasp is the perfect pallete cleanser for the sheer devastation of the last movie, full of whimsy, joy, and laughs.

It’s been two years since the events of Captain America: Civil War, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) cut a deal with the Feds to be on house arrest. With mere days left, he has a dream involving Janet Van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer), the original Wasp who’s trapped in the Quantum Realm. Knowing this, Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and his daughter Hope (Evangeline Lilly) now need him to find her while dealing with the threat of Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen) who has plans of her own.

What struck me the most about Ant-Man and the Wasp was how much the tone of the movie reminded me of the original Iron Man; the light breezy tone, and its willingness to embrace the absurdity of its premise (for God’s sake, a giant Hello Kitty Pez dispenser is used as a weapon).

The chemistry among the actors is just top notch. The banter between Scott and Hank is like something out an old Howard Hawks comedy. It’s almost rapid fire and just makes you smile the entire time, while never short changing Hope, even deepening the relationship between her and Scott.

As many a Marvel fan can attest, the weakness of Marvel films are the villains, and how they’re just the same as the heroes, down to their powers. Not here though. Ghost has phase powers that prove to be so radically different it actually made me worried for Scott and Hope. It was something unique that kept me glued to the screen.

While I enjoyed the original Ant-Man, this sequel is so much better in almost every conceivable way; its funnier, has a better pace, the acting, the dialogue, the villain, you get it. I didn’t expect to enjoy it as much as I did, but I was so swept up in its storytelling that I forgot all about Infinity War.

Well, almost.

Advertisements

Incredibles 2 (2018) Review

One of the most hotly anticipated sequels from the Pixar brand is finally here. Incredibles 2, to get to the point, is an excellent follow up to the original, and that is not light praise by any means.

Picking up an instant after the end of the first film, Winston Deavor (Bob Odenkirk) and his sister Evelyn (Katherine Keener) want to legitimize superheroes again and tap Elasti-Girl (Holly Hunter) to be the face of a new campaign. This leads Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) to stay at home and take care of the kids, while a new threat looms.

Man did I have a grin on my face during this movie. Incredibles 2 has the exact same feel as the original does. In some ways this feels like the rest of the story, completely organic to the characters and man that’s tough to pull off.

The main plot concerning Elasti-Girl is thrilling, and it never provides a dull moment. I admired the social commentaries that it threw in; just subtle enough for the adults to get it, but not have it drag the movie down in being preachy. It made me want to see the movie again so I could pick a part those subtleties.

But what elevates this movie to being neck and neck with the original in terms of quality is Mr. Incredible taking care of his youngest son, Jack-Jack. I just kept laughing and couldn’t get enough of it. Seeing a hulking superhero barely being able to function while being a parent was so relatable. Even the fact that he has to call in his best friend Frozone (Samuel L. Jackson) to help him manage the kids is just comedic gold to me. This subplot alone is worth the price of admission.

At this point, I’m not surprised that Incredibles 2 is just a fantastic movie, even 14 years after the release of the original. The story and acting are top notch, the commentary is on point, the animation is fucking gorgeous to look at, so there’s little to disappoint. If anything, I wanted more of the Jack-Jack subplot. I’m giggling even just thinking about it.

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Review

Whenever I go into a Star Wars movie, the first thing I expect is to be entertained. Not some deep meditation on life or whatever, just a good entertaining movie to engross me for a couple of hours. With that in mind, I’m pleased as punch that Solo: A Star Wars Story met those expectations.

Taking place roughly ten years before the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, young Han Solo (Alden Ehrenreich) is trying to get back to his homeworld of Corellia to return to his love Qi’ra (Emilia Clarke) when he gets embroiled, along with the Wookie Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo), with a smuggler named Beckett (Woody Harrelson) who has to deliver cargo to crime boss Dryden (Paul Bettany). Having then recruited Captain Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) for the heist, this sets in motion the events that came to shape him as the scoundrel we know and love.

Origins are a tricky thing to pull off; by the end we know what’ll happen. But director Ron Howard knows how to balance new events to keep us surprised while also showing us events that we actually want to see. The meeting between Han and Chewie didn’t happen the way I would’ve thought it did, but that’s a great thing. It manages to fulfill a lot of those childhood questions that I had, but in a way that was organic to the plot, and not just some checklist of shit that has to be in the movie.

Ehrenreich’s performance as young Solo manages to hit just the right notes. When he gives that smirk, or a bit of that swagger, I thought, “There’s Han” and believe me that is no easy feat. The movie completely shines when he’s with Chewie giving off that same chemistry that was in the original films. And its completely entertaining seeing how Lando and Han met. It even fits with their interaction in The Empire Strikes Back. There’s just a lot of love and joy in these performances.

But if there were any faults with Solo I’d say is that there are some scenes that attempt to illicit an emotional response that just manages to fall flat; some death scenes that I knew I should feel sad about but I just didn’t. Some work, and are crucial to the character of Solo, but others just felt exploitative. Speaking of which, that’s also how I felt with a cameo in the 3rd act, that made me roll my eyes; I just saw it as fan service, having no real purpose to the plot or the development of Han.

With those qualms aside, Solo is just a fun, entertaining movie. It accomplished what it set out to do, which was to be a fun swashbuckling adventure. Its paced wonderfully, seriously it left me wanting more, the performances are first rate, and I actually got to see events that I always wanted to know more about. Look, this isn’t the best Star Wars movie ever made but it is one of the most endearing ones.

Deadpool 2 (2018) Review

It’s difficult to review a movie like Deadpool 2. It’s like that with most comedies anyways, but it still needs to be done. It basically boils down to this: if you loved the first one, then you’re sure as shit going to love this sequel which accomplishes everything a good sequel does.

After going through some shit, Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is having a bit of an existential crisis. After trying to help a kid with mutant powers, Russell (Julian Dennison) and being sent to Mutant jail, a guy from the future named Cable (Josh Brolin) goes through time to kill the little bastard. Deadpool puts together a team that includes Domino (Zazie Beetz) to stop him.

Pretty much everything you loved from the first movie is back this time around, but with a budget. The in jokes are more meta, and even scathing (the DC Universe quip gets me every time). At times, the movie seems even bolder than before, like there was something more to prove this time around; like their not a fluke.

At times it even feels like the Deadpool films are fearless in the characters that they show. Look, as much of a fan as I am, I kind of gave up on seeing Cable, much less Domino, on the big screen. But there they are. Causing shit.

While the only criticism I had for the first film was that the origin section came off to dark and tonally inconsistent, this time around its even darker, but manages to find the balance with the humor. Really, everyone here, especially Brolin’s Cable, give weight to their characters and don’t see it as a joke. That’s Wade’s job. For me in that respect, this sequel is better than the original.

You really can’t go wrong with this movie if you love any of the characters in this movie. It’s more of the same (but with a budget) and honestly, who wouldn’t want more of that?

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Review

This has been 10 years in the making; the promise of a shared universe between films finally reaches it’s apex with Avengers: Infinity War. This is everything that I always dreamed of when I was a child; just an unrelenting battle against a seemingly unstoppable foe.

Thanos (Josh Brolin) is the Mad Titan and he has been searching the Galaxy far and wide for the Infinity Stones, six gems that represent all of existence: Time, Power, Reality, Mind, Space, and Soul. If the six stones are brought together than the wielder controls the universe. This forces all of the universe’s heroes to band together including Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Spider-Man (Tom Holland), Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) and so on.

This flick is a dream come true for comic book fans. Almost every single character from the previous entries make an appearance here. This is the cinematic equivalent of a company wide crossover. And speaking as a fan, I loved it. Great care was taken to ensure that all the heroes spoke with all their distinct voices and that is where the fun truly lies. I mean come on, didn’t you wonder how Iron Man would react to meeting Star Lord (Chris Pratt) with all that sass? You just chuckled at the thought.

Alright, no more tip toeing around this: the film has no real plot as a single entry to the franchise. If you, or someone you know is thinking of making this their first Marvel movie then that is a huge mistake. There is no set up to the conflict, the movie just jumps right in and doesn’t fuck around. This isn’t a bad thing, far from it. This is the accumulation of 10 years of movies that have been slowly setting up this movie. You don’t have to have seen every movie, if you have a favorite character then the movie works, but it does help to feel some sort of emotion.

And this movie is emotional, and powerful. No spoilers here, obviously, but I can’t imagine a single fan not being shocked by what happens in Infinity War. I was shaken up by the time the credits rolled, and it left me excited for the next one. Yes, even Ant-Man and The Wasp. This is how superhero films should be made; with humor, love, excitement, and devastation.

Ready Player One (2018) Review

If you were born in the 80s, then pretty much director Steven Spielberg raised you. Everything from Raiders of the Lost Ark to E.T., to movies he produced like Back to the Future and The Goonies the man helped to craft 80s pop culture.

Ready Player One is an ode to that wonderful era from things like movies, music and especially video games. It’s a buffet of pop culture that may seem to be overcrowded, but isn’t overwhelming. It’s actually quite sweet, and Spielberg’s best film since Minority Report.

In the year 2045, 18 year old Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan) lives in an impoverished area named The Stacks. He dreams of a better life for himself and escapes into a virtual reality called The Oasis, where you can be whoever you want to be. The creator of the Oasis, James Halliday (Mark Rylance) passes away and leaves a will detailing a contest; whoever solves the clues and obtains the 3 keys, wins the Oasis.

Along with other players, Art3mis (Olivia Cooke) and Aech (Lana Waithe), the race is on to obtain the keys before the head of a cooperation (Ben Mendelsohn) gets his hands on it and destroys it.

If the plot sounds like it’s Willy Wonka meets The Matrix that’s because it totally is! And man is it so much fun to watch! Knowing Spielberg, the film is vibrant and stunning to behold. I can’t remember the last time I was immersed in a cinematic world.

The acting is on point for every single performance, but the scene stealer is Mark Rylance as Halliday. It was known that Spielberg wanted Gene Wilder to play the part, bringing the Willy Wonka motif full circle, but I can’t imagine a better performance. It so layered, nuanced, and even heartbreaking that he becomes the heart of the movie. Rylance is now not only one of my favorite actors now, but he’s one of the best actors out there.

If you have a casual knowledge of Spielberg’s films, you know that John Williams has composed the score to almost every film that he’s made. Due to schedule conflicts, Williams couldn’t score the movie, being replaced by Back to the Future composer Alan Silvestri. Jesus Christ this is his best score since Forrest Gump. He keeps the music pumping during the action, throws some cues from his earlier work that doesn’t distract at all. It felt like Halliday chose this music for his easter egg hunt.

Steven Spielberg has made some incredible movies as of late, but he has veered away from the rousing popcorn flicks that he built his career on. I have never seen such an amazing return to form, and it just proves that the man still has a thing or two to show us.

Black Panther (2018) Review

There has never been a more relevant time for the Black Panther film to come out. With the issue of representation in film being such a hot button issue, nothing made me happier to see a film starring a black superhero, especially one with this much joy and rich character development.

After the death of his father in Captain America: Civil War, T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) has taken the mantle of King of the technologically advanced African country of Wakanda. As T’Challa comes to grips with being king, a foreigner by the name of Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) lays seige to Wakanda, forcing the King to relay on his former flame Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) and his tech savy sister, Shuri (Letitia Wright) to protect his kingdom and all of its secrets.

Since a lot of people are making a big deal over a black superhero, which is all well and good, it doesn’t mean shit to me if the movie sucks. Thankfully it doesn’t. Marvel has it’s characters down to a science, and that’s where Black Panther truly shines. T’Challa is a fully realised character with empathy and a sense of duty. He goes on a spiritual journey that many of us have been on, and it gives him a true sense of history.

The MCU has been know to have some underwhelming villains for most of its run, but Michael B. Jordan’s Killmonger is one of the best antagonists in the series. Much like Alfred Molina’s Doc Ock in Spider-Man 2, you get a clear understanding of Killmonger’s motives, hell I even found myself sympathizing with him. He was just captivating to watch every second he was on screen.

Black Panther continues Marvel’s Phase 3 overarching theme of fathers and sons. Here is a man who is trying to follow in his father’s footsteps while trying to be his own man, his own king. It even goes deeper into it’s theme; can a son forgive the sins of his father? Should he have to pay that price?

Of course the action is first rate, and you will find yourself in awe of the spectacle, but there is more than that. The issues of race, heritage, and legacy are all there to be absorbed and discussed. This shouldn’t have come as a surprise, but it still gets to me that a character, up until a few years ago, was considered to be a B-lister at best, has been given a treatment that is usually reserved for more prominent characters. King T’Challa is a character I can’t wait to see again.

The Shape of Water (2017) Review 

     Director Guillermo Del Toro has always been an astonishing visual director, even when it comes to a few of his lesser films. Even then the man has had a love for everything horror and fantasy, but even then there has always been a subtle fairy tale quality to his work. The Shape of Water not only embraces these attributes, they have come together to bring a different type of film that is clearly one of his most personal movies. 

     In 1960s America, Elisa (Sally Hawkins) is a mute woman working at a government facility with her friend Zelda (Octavia Spencer) when an amphibious creature (Doug Jones) is brought in for experiments overseen by Dr. Hoffstetler (David Stahlbarg). Elisa and the creature form a deep bond that is threatened by Agent Strickland (Michael Shannon) and his need to protect America. 

     Let me get this out of the way and say that it’s pretty obvious that this is just Del Toro’s version of the classic Creature from the Black Lagoon. Of course, it’s much more lyrical, even poetic than the earlier film. Even though the movie takes place in a bygone era of America, it feels like an entirely different world. The color schemes, with their hues of greens and blues, come off as a fairy tale. Even the musical score by Alexandre Desplat just reinforces the point, almost like something out of a French New Wave film. 

     If Sally Hawkins, and Octavia Spencer for that matter, don’t get Oscar nominations for their work, then clearly fantasy horror have no place at the Oscars. Hawkins has to give a performance entirely in pantomime, and has to rely on just her face and body movements to convey her emotions. Trust me, this is fucking hard to pull off and Hawkins makes it seem way too easy, she’s so good in this. Even Doug Jones underneath all that make-up gives such emotions, the chemistry between the two actors is better than most big budget movies that have tackled a similar romance. 

     Spencer manages to take an almost thankless role and gives depth to emotion to a woman who’s living at the height of the civil rights movement. Through the vile character of Strickland, Del Toro manages to touch on the issues of racism and sexism without getting preachy, but enhances the themes of isolation and rejection, even within our own civilization. 

     Del Toro has crafted a deeply personal work of art here, one that, yes, does pay homage to old school monster movies but that has its own qualities, it’s own take on the outcast monster story that we all grew up on in some form or another. It is just without question that this is one of the best films of the year, and needs to be seen. 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) Review

     I still remember, all those decades ago when I first saw Star Wars and I wanted to be Luke Skywalker. He was, and will always be, my first childhood hero, as surely must be the case for countless others. So know we’ve reached the 8th episode, Star Wars: The Last Jedi has everything you could want from a Star Wars flick, even if its not in the way that you expected it. 

     Picking right where The Force Awakens left off, The Resistance, led by General Leia (Carrie Fisher) is on its last leg as the forces of the New Order led by Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) are on the verge of wiping them out and winning the war. Poe (Oscar Isaac) sends Finn (John Boyega) and Rose (Kelly Marie Tran) on a mission to save the Resistance, while Rey (Daisy Ridley) finds the reclusive Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) to find out her destiny. 

     The Last Jedi relies on some tried and true aesthetics that does make it come alive. While the film does manage to hit some of the same plot beats as The Empire Strikes Back, it isn’t anywhere near as bad as the previous film did when it came to A New Hope. Trust me, that’s a good thing. Some of the questions that were posed before are answered here, whether we like it or not. 

     I do have to say that the performances are on point here, with Hamill giving a truly melancholic performance as Luke, that was easily my favorite in the entire film. The weariness, the humor on display that reminds us of that young farm boy from Tatooine. It really resonate with you if you grew up with the Saga. 

     I noticed especially that the humor was kicked up a lot, and it did make me smile; Be it from Poe, or Leia herself, I was overjoyed that the movie remembered that this is a children’s film, and that my God, children do love to laugh most of all. 

     If there were any egregious flaw to the film, is that there needed to be a lot of things fleshed out. I mean, a lot of shit. The irony that this is the longest Star Wars movie sure as shit isn’t lost on me. There needed to be more with Stoke (Andy Serkis), a lot more on this pretty kick ass Casino, and way more between Luke and Rey. If anything, the movie felt rushed, almost as if writer/director Rian Johnson started to put  shit that should’ve happened in Episode IX. Maybe that’s a good thing, but it just felt lacking in this respect. 

     I did enjoy The Last Jedi immensely don’t get me wrong; there are images in this movie that will stay with me forever, and even make me shed a tear or three. I guess I wanted more out of it, more of the characters I love and cherish, and not have mysteries set up only to refer to them offhand. To be fair, I may need to see this a few more times before I can even begin to rank it, but the movie succeeds in being Star Wars and for more of you, that’s more than enough.  

Justice League (2017) Review

     Well it was nice while it lasted. After loving the fuck out of Wonder Woman I was hopeful that Justice League was going to be another upward tick for the DCEU, but instead all we have now is just a disgraceful mess of a movie that wouldn’t even pass muster in a film class. 

     With the world still in mourning after the death of Superman (Henry Cavill), Batman (Ben Affleck) enlists the help of Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) to put together a team that consists of Flash (Ezra Miller), Aquaman (Jason Mamoa) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) to take down the evil Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds) before he gets some boxes that would destroy humanity. 

     Fuck where do I start with this? To reiterate, the movie is a mess; the story, the characterizations, the acting, just everything. It’s so frustrating to watch because there’s a really good movie in here. Its just not a good Justice League movie. The movie starts with Superman dead and buried, how do people move on from having their savior fucking dead? Imagine that for a second. That movie is so much more interesting than whatever the fuck you want to call this movie. 

     The characters, even Batman and Wonder Woman, are painfully underdeveloped. They have no arc. All of them. They all even work together effortlessly with no conflict. I couldn’t tell you anymore about Cyborg’s character than before I saw the movie. Aquaman to me was unrecognizable from the comic, and that’s fine, but you have to tell us as filmmakers who the hell he is, what drives him as a hero. Nope none of that. And I really wish I had some seasonings, because Steppenwolf is the blandest villain I’ve seen in a film since Thor: The Dark World. Just no personality at all. I will give credit that Ezra Miller had some good moments as The Flash, but even he seemed to trying way to hard to carry the film. There was just no chemistry between any of the actors. 

     Now to discuss the stuff I liked, no matter how fleeting, there will be some light spoilers concerning the Man of Steel. 
     So Superman gets resurrected, and that’s to be expected, but the good movie in here is how his family reacts, especially his mother. I got choked up when she saw that her little boy was alive, and the overwhelming emotions that it brings. But it’s like 2 minutes of the movie. Hell, we don’t even see how the world reacts and I think it would be a pretty big deal. I can only imagine seeing an awesome movie with the world mourning the death of a god and then have them return. But I guess we’ll see a team beat up a shit villain instead. 

     I’ve waiting decades to see a Justice League live action film, and this is a poor excuse of a movie. I can’t imagine anyone feeling like they got to see their favorite characters be bad asses when we don’t even get a feel for who they are. The high benchmark of superhero movies is The Dark Knight and this movie should be ashamed of itself for believing it belongs in the same sentence as that masterpiece. Remember folks and fans alike, you deserve so much better than this. You truly do.