Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018) Review

You’d think that after Avengers: Infinity War any Marvel movie that doesn’t follow up the events in that movie would just automatically suck.

Well you’d be wrong. So happily wrong.

Ant-Man and the Wasp is the perfect pallete cleanser for the sheer devastation of the last movie, full of whimsy, joy, and laughs.

It’s been two years since the events of Captain America: Civil War, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) cut a deal with the Feds to be on house arrest. With mere days left, he has a dream involving Janet Van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer), the original Wasp who’s trapped in the Quantum Realm. Knowing this, Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and his daughter Hope (Evangeline Lilly) now need him to find her while dealing with the threat of Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen) who has plans of her own.

What struck me the most about Ant-Man and the Wasp was how much the tone of the movie reminded me of the original Iron Man; the light breezy tone, and its willingness to embrace the absurdity of its premise (for God’s sake, a giant Hello Kitty Pez dispenser is used as a weapon).

The chemistry among the actors is just top notch. The banter between Scott and Hank is like something out an old Howard Hawks comedy. It’s almost rapid fire and just makes you smile the entire time, while never short changing Hope, even deepening the relationship between her and Scott.

As many a Marvel fan can attest, the weakness of Marvel films are the villains, and how they’re just the same as the heroes, down to their powers. Not here though. Ghost has phase powers that prove to be so radically different it actually made me worried for Scott and Hope. It was something unique that kept me glued to the screen.

While I enjoyed the original Ant-Man, this sequel is so much better in almost every conceivable way; its funnier, has a better pace, the acting, the dialogue, the villain, you get it. I didn’t expect to enjoy it as much as I did, but I was so swept up in its storytelling that I forgot all about Infinity War.

Well, almost.

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Why Life is Beautiful (1997) is the Best Father’s Day Film

There are many films that celebrate fathers in their own way; usually as some sort sport film or fathers and sons trying to reconnect in some fashion. Roberto Benigni’s Italian film Life is Beautiful does something a bit different in it’s portrayal of the relationship, which shows the lengths a man would go through to protect the most valuable thing a child can have: their innocence.

The movie starts simply enough in 1939 with Guido (Benigni) moving into a little villiage and falls in love with a local girl named Dora (Nicoletta Braschi). After a comical whirlwind romance they marry and have a child named Giosue (Giorgio Cantarini).

Five years pass and Guido dotes on his child, using humor to answer some of life’s difficult questions like why Jews (like themselves) can’t go into the store. But then sure enough they get sent to a concentration camp where Guido convinces little Giosue that its all a game and if they get one thousand points they get a tank.

Now I must admit this does sound depressing as shit, but it’s not. There is a wonderful spirit to the whole thing where Guido, even in the darkest of times, thinks only of his son and shields him from the monstrosities that surround them. Whether its pretending to speak German to “explain” the rules of the game or hiding in the bunks to npt be found, he thinks quick on his feet to protect his son’s innocence.

Every father in the world needs to see this movie; if only to show how powerful a father’s love can be in it’s purest form. A majority of films today have failed to show this, but here’s one that basks in its unconditional love. This is a film that celebrates fathers to the highest degree, and its something I cannot stress enough. By the end of the film you will truly see that in spite of everything, Life is Beautiful.

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Review

Whenever I go into a Star Wars movie, the first thing I expect is to be entertained. Not some deep meditation on life or whatever, just a good entertaining movie to engross me for a couple of hours. With that in mind, I’m pleased as punch that Solo: A Star Wars Story met those expectations.

Taking place roughly ten years before the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, young Han Solo (Alden Ehrenreich) is trying to get back to his homeworld of Corellia to return to his love Qi’ra (Emilia Clarke) when he gets embroiled, along with the Wookie Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo), with a smuggler named Beckett (Woody Harrelson) who has to deliver cargo to crime boss Dryden (Paul Bettany). Having then recruited Captain Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover) for the heist, this sets in motion the events that came to shape him as the scoundrel we know and love.

Origins are a tricky thing to pull off; by the end we know what’ll happen. But director Ron Howard knows how to balance new events to keep us surprised while also showing us events that we actually want to see. The meeting between Han and Chewie didn’t happen the way I would’ve thought it did, but that’s a great thing. It manages to fulfill a lot of those childhood questions that I had, but in a way that was organic to the plot, and not just some checklist of shit that has to be in the movie.

Ehrenreich’s performance as young Solo manages to hit just the right notes. When he gives that smirk, or a bit of that swagger, I thought, “There’s Han” and believe me that is no easy feat. The movie completely shines when he’s with Chewie giving off that same chemistry that was in the original films. And its completely entertaining seeing how Lando and Han met. It even fits with their interaction in The Empire Strikes Back. There’s just a lot of love and joy in these performances.

But if there were any faults with Solo I’d say is that there are some scenes that attempt to illicit an emotional response that just manages to fall flat; some death scenes that I knew I should feel sad about but I just didn’t. Some work, and are crucial to the character of Solo, but others just felt exploitative. Speaking of which, that’s also how I felt with a cameo in the 3rd act, that made me roll my eyes; I just saw it as fan service, having no real purpose to the plot or the development of Han.

With those qualms aside, Solo is just a fun, entertaining movie. It accomplished what it set out to do, which was to be a fun swashbuckling adventure. Its paced wonderfully, seriously it left me wanting more, the performances are first rate, and I actually got to see events that I always wanted to know more about. Look, this isn’t the best Star Wars movie ever made but it is one of the most endearing ones.

Deadpool 2 (2018) Review

It’s difficult to review a movie like Deadpool 2. It’s like that with most comedies anyways, but it still needs to be done. It basically boils down to this: if you loved the first one, then you’re sure as shit going to love this sequel which accomplishes everything a good sequel does.

After going through some shit, Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is having a bit of an existential crisis. After trying to help a kid with mutant powers, Russell (Julian Dennison) and being sent to Mutant jail, a guy from the future named Cable (Josh Brolin) goes through time to kill the little bastard. Deadpool puts together a team that includes Domino (Zazie Beetz) to stop him.

Pretty much everything you loved from the first movie is back this time around, but with a budget. The in jokes are more meta, and even scathing (the DC Universe quip gets me every time). At times, the movie seems even bolder than before, like there was something more to prove this time around; like their not a fluke.

At times it even feels like the Deadpool films are fearless in the characters that they show. Look, as much of a fan as I am, I kind of gave up on seeing Cable, much less Domino, on the big screen. But there they are. Causing shit.

While the only criticism I had for the first film was that the origin section came off to dark and tonally inconsistent, this time around its even darker, but manages to find the balance with the humor. Really, everyone here, especially Brolin’s Cable, give weight to their characters and don’t see it as a joke. That’s Wade’s job. For me in that respect, this sequel is better than the original.

You really can’t go wrong with this movie if you love any of the characters in this movie. It’s more of the same (but with a budget) and honestly, who wouldn’t want more of that?

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Review

This has been 10 years in the making; the promise of a shared universe between films finally reaches it’s apex with Avengers: Infinity War. This is everything that I always dreamed of when I was a child; just an unrelenting battle against a seemingly unstoppable foe.

Thanos (Josh Brolin) is the Mad Titan and he has been searching the Galaxy far and wide for the Infinity Stones, six gems that represent all of existence: Time, Power, Reality, Mind, Space, and Soul. If the six stones are brought together than the wielder controls the universe. This forces all of the universe’s heroes to band together including Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Spider-Man (Tom Holland), Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) and so on.

This flick is a dream come true for comic book fans. Almost every single character from the previous entries make an appearance here. This is the cinematic equivalent of a company wide crossover. And speaking as a fan, I loved it. Great care was taken to ensure that all the heroes spoke with all their distinct voices and that is where the fun truly lies. I mean come on, didn’t you wonder how Iron Man would react to meeting Star Lord (Chris Pratt) with all that sass? You just chuckled at the thought.

Alright, no more tip toeing around this: the film has no real plot as a single entry to the franchise. If you, or someone you know is thinking of making this their first Marvel movie then that is a huge mistake. There is no set up to the conflict, the movie just jumps right in and doesn’t fuck around. This isn’t a bad thing, far from it. This is the accumulation of 10 years of movies that have been slowly setting up this movie. You don’t have to have seen every movie, if you have a favorite character then the movie works, but it does help to feel some sort of emotion.

And this movie is emotional, and powerful. No spoilers here, obviously, but I can’t imagine a single fan not being shocked by what happens in Infinity War. I was shaken up by the time the credits rolled, and it left me excited for the next one. Yes, even Ant-Man and The Wasp. This is how superhero films should be made; with humor, love, excitement, and devastation.

Isle of Dogs (2018) Review

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is an incredible feat of filmmaking. I have seen possibly hundreds of animated films throughout my life and I am still in awe of what I saw on the screen. Something so unique, so inspired by classic fables and stories that just resonate with you even if you don’t even love dogs.

In a near future Japan, Mayor Kobayashi (Kunichi Nomura) has declared that all dogs be sent to an island in exile as a “dog flu” runs rampant throughout the town. As the dogs make a life for themselves, a group of dogs find a little boy named Atari (Koyo Rankin) lands on the isle to find his dog Spots (Liev Schreiber). Lead by Chief (Brian Cranston) they set out on a trek that could lead them to a shocking discovery.

Isle of Dogs is quite simply, extraordinary. The acting, which is subtle, almost soothing, to the animation that just let my jaw drop. I have never seen a movie seamlessly integrate different styles of animation like this before. The film is just a feast for the eyes, the fantastical Japan that is depicted is detailed so meticulously that I’m certain that you could find something new every single time you watch it.

As per your usual Wes Anderson film, the dialogue and acting are subtle in every which way. I can’t imagine how many jokes slipped past because because I’m laughing and just fixated on the screen. That’s not to say there’s no heart to the story, far from it. Atari’s journey with Chief and the the other dogs will tug at any animal lovers heartstrings without getting bogged down in it’s own sentimentality.

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs is the reason I go to the movies; to see other worlds, other cultures, and get immersed in it. It’s just such a lovely movie, so rich, stylized and beautiful. Not only is this one of the best films of the year, thus far, but it’s one of the best animated films of the decade. I forgot that films can be this good.

Pitch Perfect 3 (2017) Review

     Man has this franchise come a damn long way; I remember when Pitch Perfect was a coming of age take that used the power of song to over come adversity. Now, Pitch Perfect 3 still has some of those key elements, but it’s pretty damn clear that if this series doesn’t end with this installment, then we’re going to have the Fast and the Furious of a cappella singing. 

     Beca (Anna Kendrick) has just quit her job for a record label, and she reunites with the other Bellas, Fat Amy (Rebel Wilson), Chloe (Brittany Snow), Aubrey (Anna Camp), Emily (Hailee Steinfeld), and even Lilly (Hana Mae Lee) who go on a USO competition for DJ Khaled. Things hot a bit of a snag when Fat Amy’s father (John Lithgow) shows up at an inopportune time. 

     I have actually enjoyed the first two Pitch Perfect films with their sweet simple stories of self-esteem and pretty fun song covers. Sure they all seem to use the same plot as a crutch, but they work due to the chemistry amongst the actors. 

     Man, did this one try way too hard to be different. 

     While there’s still a competition to be had, it feels shoehorned into the plot, and instead we get some international intrigue involving Fat Amy’s dad, which left me wondering if this was truly necessary. It does appear that the writers ran out of ideas so soon, and that maybe a ten year gap between films would have been beneficial. 

     Don’t get me wrong; I did laugh during the movie, catching myself while realizing that the story was fucking ridiculous. As a tip, think about how the first one started off, then look at what’s on the screen. You won’t be able to help yourself from laughing. Even then, the music was enjoyable, although a bit lacking, the Bellas still have that charm that we should come to expect by now. 

     There have been worst trilogy cappers, believe me, but the story needs to end here. If it goes on any further, then everything charming and lovely about the series will be lost. 

The Disaster Artist (2017) Review

     In 2003, a movie was made that was so bad that it became the next Rocky Horror Picture Show in its cult like status as one of the greatest bad movies ever made. 

     That movie was The Room written, produced, and directed by Tommy Wiseau, and it is just a masterpiece of shitty filmmaking. And now we have James Franco directing (and starring as Wiseau himself) a movie based on the novel of the same name by Greg Sistero (played by Dave Franco) about how this ode to inept filmmaking got made. 

     Greg is just a struggling actor trying to make it in show business when he meets Tommy in an acting class. They form a bond, and when things don’t go their way they decide to make The Room as a way to make a name for themselves. As they assemble their crew, their friendship will be put to the test as their passion for filmmaking could cost them everything. 

     It’s difficult to describe what’s at work here. If anything this is the modern day equivalent of Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, and it takes a similar approach; it doesn’t make fun of these odd characters who at their core, just want to make a movie. It just so happens that that movie is hilariously bad. But that’s what makes The Disaster Artist work completely. The friendship that develops between Tommy and Greg is what makes it so endearing that it makes you root for them. 

     Without going into spoilers, but this film has one of the greatest ensemble casts I’ve seen in awhile with Seth Rogan playing director of photography Sandy Sinclair, and Josh Hutcherson playing Philip who plays Denny. There’s so many more but I can’t dream of ruining who else appears just for the laugh out loud factor of it all. And every single actor nails their roles. 

     To be honest, I had doubts that the movie could be pulled off because of Tommy Wiseau himself. Everybody who’s seen The Room knows that Tommy is a unique personality to put it mildly. When James Franco was announced to be playing the part, I was apprehensive that he could capture the weird nature of Wiseau. 

     Franco nailed it. 

     This is by far Franco’s absolute best performance he has ever given. The guy has always been a good actor, but this is something else entirely. As someone who has shamelessly watched The Room I know the speech patterns and syntax that Wiseau speaks in, and Franco hits every single fucking note. There were times I forgot it was Franco that I was seeing on screen. Easily, this is the best performance I have seen from a male in years. James Franco ain’t a movie star anymore; he is one of the most fearless actors (and directors for that matter) working today. 

     I thought a lot that if were possible to enjoy The Disaster Artist without having seen The Room and I believe you can. It helps if you have, don’t get me wrong, but at its core the movie is about two friends who embark on showing Hollywood what they got to offer. The fact that it was one of the worst movies you’ll ever see is irrelevant, they had a dream, a goal, and they achieved it. This is one of the best movies of the year, far and above. It’s such an inspiring tale, that deserves to be seen and praised with such high marks.  

Justice League (2017) Review

     Well it was nice while it lasted. After loving the fuck out of Wonder Woman I was hopeful that Justice League was going to be another upward tick for the DCEU, but instead all we have now is just a disgraceful mess of a movie that wouldn’t even pass muster in a film class. 

     With the world still in mourning after the death of Superman (Henry Cavill), Batman (Ben Affleck) enlists the help of Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) to put together a team that consists of Flash (Ezra Miller), Aquaman (Jason Mamoa) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) to take down the evil Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds) before he gets some boxes that would destroy humanity. 

     Fuck where do I start with this? To reiterate, the movie is a mess; the story, the characterizations, the acting, just everything. It’s so frustrating to watch because there’s a really good movie in here. Its just not a good Justice League movie. The movie starts with Superman dead and buried, how do people move on from having their savior fucking dead? Imagine that for a second. That movie is so much more interesting than whatever the fuck you want to call this movie. 

     The characters, even Batman and Wonder Woman, are painfully underdeveloped. They have no arc. All of them. They all even work together effortlessly with no conflict. I couldn’t tell you anymore about Cyborg’s character than before I saw the movie. Aquaman to me was unrecognizable from the comic, and that’s fine, but you have to tell us as filmmakers who the hell he is, what drives him as a hero. Nope none of that. And I really wish I had some seasonings, because Steppenwolf is the blandest villain I’ve seen in a film since Thor: The Dark World. Just no personality at all. I will give credit that Ezra Miller had some good moments as The Flash, but even he seemed to trying way to hard to carry the film. There was just no chemistry between any of the actors. 

     Now to discuss the stuff I liked, no matter how fleeting, there will be some light spoilers concerning the Man of Steel. 
     So Superman gets resurrected, and that’s to be expected, but the good movie in here is how his family reacts, especially his mother. I got choked up when she saw that her little boy was alive, and the overwhelming emotions that it brings. But it’s like 2 minutes of the movie. Hell, we don’t even see how the world reacts and I think it would be a pretty big deal. I can only imagine seeing an awesome movie with the world mourning the death of a god and then have them return. But I guess we’ll see a team beat up a shit villain instead. 

     I’ve waiting decades to see a Justice League live action film, and this is a poor excuse of a movie. I can’t imagine anyone feeling like they got to see their favorite characters be bad asses when we don’t even get a feel for who they are. The high benchmark of superhero movies is The Dark Knight and this movie should be ashamed of itself for believing it belongs in the same sentence as that masterpiece. Remember folks and fans alike, you deserve so much better than this. You truly do. 

     

Thor: Ragnarock (2017) Review

     The last Thor film, The Dark World, is still the worst Marvel film from their output. The first one being a silly lighthearted affair, but man that follow up… such a piece of shit. Well, I’ve never been happier to see an entry just improve so exponentially. I actually walked out with a smile on my face, instead of punching anyone in the face. 

     Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is trying to find his father Odin (Anthony Hopkins) with the help of his douchebag brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston). They both come across the Goddess of Death, Hela (Cate Blanchett) who wishes to rule over Asgard. Thor, now defenseless, finds himself on a strange planet run by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum) and has a run in with a long missing friend… Its the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo).

     Clearly Thor: Ragnarock is the best of the Thor films, and so much fun. The best moments involving Thor in his other appearances are the humorous ones. Hemsworth has such great comedic timing that in retrospect, made the Dark World such a bore was the lack of humor. Everyone in the movie has phenomenal comedic moments, and I want to see Thor and Hulk cause some more shit. They are so good together. Blanchett’s Hela is a character so rich and evil, that makes you wonder why the hell she wasn’t in this series sooner? I was scared of her, because Thor was, and you can clearly see why when presented with the film. 

     More than anything I was awestruck by the musical score from Mark Mothersbaugh. Director Taika Waititi was clearly going for an 80s retro feel, and that score really brought that feeling home, with sparing use of synth, but once in use the aesthetic truly came alive. 

     I’m impressed by the fact that Marvel Studios is three for three in one year of releasing movies. All have succeeded in just being pure pieces of entertainment while actually having both thematic and character arcs. I officially can’t wait for the next adventure these guys get into, and with this being the 18th movie in a franchise, you know that’s some high fucking praise.