Pitch Perfect 3 (2017) Review

     Man has this franchise come a damn long way; I remember when Pitch Perfect was a coming of age take that used the power of song to over come adversity. Now, Pitch Perfect 3 still has some of those key elements, but it’s pretty damn clear that if this series doesn’t end with this installment, then we’re going to have the Fast and the Furious of a cappella singing. 

     Beca (Anna Kendrick) has just quit her job for a record label, and she reunites with the other Bellas, Fat Amy (Rebel Wilson), Chloe (Brittany Snow), Aubrey (Anna Camp), Emily (Hailee Steinfeld), and even Lilly (Hana Mae Lee) who go on a USO competition for DJ Khaled. Things hot a bit of a snag when Fat Amy’s father (John Lithgow) shows up at an inopportune time. 

     I have actually enjoyed the first two Pitch Perfect films with their sweet simple stories of self-esteem and pretty fun song covers. Sure they all seem to use the same plot as a crutch, but they work due to the chemistry amongst the actors. 

     Man, did this one try way too hard to be different. 

     While there’s still a competition to be had, it feels shoehorned into the plot, and instead we get some international intrigue involving Fat Amy’s dad, which left me wondering if this was truly necessary. It does appear that the writers ran out of ideas so soon, and that maybe a ten year gap between films would have been beneficial. 

     Don’t get me wrong; I did laugh during the movie, catching myself while realizing that the story was fucking ridiculous. As a tip, think about how the first one started off, then look at what’s on the screen. You won’t be able to help yourself from laughing. Even then, the music was enjoyable, although a bit lacking, the Bellas still have that charm that we should come to expect by now. 

     There have been worst trilogy cappers, believe me, but the story needs to end here. If it goes on any further, then everything charming and lovely about the series will be lost. 


The Disaster Artist (2017) Review

     In 2003, a movie was made that was so bad that it became the next Rocky Horror Picture Show in its cult like status as one of the greatest bad movies ever made. 

     That movie was The Room written, produced, and directed by Tommy Wiseau, and it is just a masterpiece of shitty filmmaking. And now we have James Franco directing (and starring as Wiseau himself) a movie based on the novel of the same name by Greg Sistero (played by Dave Franco) about how this ode to inept filmmaking got made. 

     Greg is just a struggling actor trying to make it in show business when he meets Tommy in an acting class. They form a bond, and when things don’t go their way they decide to make The Room as a way to make a name for themselves. As they assemble their crew, their friendship will be put to the test as their passion for filmmaking could cost them everything. 

     It’s difficult to describe what’s at work here. If anything this is the modern day equivalent of Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, and it takes a similar approach; it doesn’t make fun of these odd characters who at their core, just want to make a movie. It just so happens that that movie is hilariously bad. But that’s what makes The Disaster Artist work completely. The friendship that develops between Tommy and Greg is what makes it so endearing that it makes you root for them. 

     Without going into spoilers, but this film has one of the greatest ensemble casts I’ve seen in awhile with Seth Rogan playing director of photography Sandy Sinclair, and Josh Hutcherson playing Philip who plays Denny. There’s so many more but I can’t dream of ruining who else appears just for the laugh out loud factor of it all. And every single actor nails their roles. 

     To be honest, I had doubts that the movie could be pulled off because of Tommy Wiseau himself. Everybody who’s seen The Room knows that Tommy is a unique personality to put it mildly. When James Franco was announced to be playing the part, I was apprehensive that he could capture the weird nature of Wiseau. 

     Franco nailed it. 

     This is by far Franco’s absolute best performance he has ever given. The guy has always been a good actor, but this is something else entirely. As someone who has shamelessly watched The Room I know the speech patterns and syntax that Wiseau speaks in, and Franco hits every single fucking note. There were times I forgot it was Franco that I was seeing on screen. Easily, this is the best performance I have seen from a male in years. James Franco ain’t a movie star anymore; he is one of the most fearless actors (and directors for that matter) working today. 

     I thought a lot that if were possible to enjoy The Disaster Artist without having seen The Room and I believe you can. It helps if you have, don’t get me wrong, but at its core the movie is about two friends who embark on showing Hollywood what they got to offer. The fact that it was one of the worst movies you’ll ever see is irrelevant, they had a dream, a goal, and they achieved it. This is one of the best movies of the year, far and above. It’s such an inspiring tale, that deserves to be seen and praised with such high marks.  

Justice League (2017) Review

     Well it was nice while it lasted. After loving the fuck out of Wonder Woman I was hopeful that Justice League was going to be another upward tick for the DCEU, but instead all we have now is just a disgraceful mess of a movie that wouldn’t even pass muster in a film class. 

     With the world still in mourning after the death of Superman (Henry Cavill), Batman (Ben Affleck) enlists the help of Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) to put together a team that consists of Flash (Ezra Miller), Aquaman (Jason Mamoa) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) to take down the evil Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds) before he gets some boxes that would destroy humanity. 

     Fuck where do I start with this? To reiterate, the movie is a mess; the story, the characterizations, the acting, just everything. It’s so frustrating to watch because there’s a really good movie in here. Its just not a good Justice League movie. The movie starts with Superman dead and buried, how do people move on from having their savior fucking dead? Imagine that for a second. That movie is so much more interesting than whatever the fuck you want to call this movie. 

     The characters, even Batman and Wonder Woman, are painfully underdeveloped. They have no arc. All of them. They all even work together effortlessly with no conflict. I couldn’t tell you anymore about Cyborg’s character than before I saw the movie. Aquaman to me was unrecognizable from the comic, and that’s fine, but you have to tell us as filmmakers who the hell he is, what drives him as a hero. Nope none of that. And I really wish I had some seasonings, because Steppenwolf is the blandest villain I’ve seen in a film since Thor: The Dark World. Just no personality at all. I will give credit that Ezra Miller had some good moments as The Flash, but even he seemed to trying way to hard to carry the film. There was just no chemistry between any of the actors. 

     Now to discuss the stuff I liked, no matter how fleeting, there will be some light spoilers concerning the Man of Steel. 
     So Superman gets resurrected, and that’s to be expected, but the good movie in here is how his family reacts, especially his mother. I got choked up when she saw that her little boy was alive, and the overwhelming emotions that it brings. But it’s like 2 minutes of the movie. Hell, we don’t even see how the world reacts and I think it would be a pretty big deal. I can only imagine seeing an awesome movie with the world mourning the death of a god and then have them return. But I guess we’ll see a team beat up a shit villain instead. 

     I’ve waiting decades to see a Justice League live action film, and this is a poor excuse of a movie. I can’t imagine anyone feeling like they got to see their favorite characters be bad asses when we don’t even get a feel for who they are. The high benchmark of superhero movies is The Dark Knight and this movie should be ashamed of itself for believing it belongs in the same sentence as that masterpiece. Remember folks and fans alike, you deserve so much better than this. You truly do. 


Thor: Ragnarock (2017) Review

     The last Thor film, The Dark World, is still the worst Marvel film from their output. The first one being a silly lighthearted affair, but man that follow up… such a piece of shit. Well, I’ve never been happier to see an entry just improve so exponentially. I actually walked out with a smile on my face, instead of punching anyone in the face. 

     Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is trying to find his father Odin (Anthony Hopkins) with the help of his douchebag brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston). They both come across the Goddess of Death, Hela (Cate Blanchett) who wishes to rule over Asgard. Thor, now defenseless, finds himself on a strange planet run by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum) and has a run in with a long missing friend… Its the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo).

     Clearly Thor: Ragnarock is the best of the Thor films, and so much fun. The best moments involving Thor in his other appearances are the humorous ones. Hemsworth has such great comedic timing that in retrospect, made the Dark World such a bore was the lack of humor. Everyone in the movie has phenomenal comedic moments, and I want to see Thor and Hulk cause some more shit. They are so good together. Blanchett’s Hela is a character so rich and evil, that makes you wonder why the hell she wasn’t in this series sooner? I was scared of her, because Thor was, and you can clearly see why when presented with the film. 

     More than anything I was awestruck by the musical score from Mark Mothersbaugh. Director Taika Waititi was clearly going for an 80s retro feel, and that score really brought that feeling home, with sparing use of synth, but once in use the aesthetic truly came alive. 

     I’m impressed by the fact that Marvel Studios is three for three in one year of releasing movies. All have succeeded in just being pure pieces of entertainment while actually having both thematic and character arcs. I officially can’t wait for the next adventure these guys get into, and with this being the 18th movie in a franchise, you know that’s some high fucking praise. 

Cult of Chucky (2017) Review

     We’re seven films in, and 29 years later, into a franchise that many folks have all but forgotten. Chucky has always been a part of my childhood, and lead me to an intense distrust of dolls, that through the highs and lows I always stuck by him. Friends till the end, right?

     Following the events of the previous movie Curse of Chucky, this new installment titled Cult of Chucky, sees Nica (Fiona Dourif) locked up in a mental institution having been framed for murders that Chucky (Brad Dourif) committed. With the doll making his way through the asylum, Andy Barclay (Alex Vincent) makes his way to put a stop to Chucky’s reign of terror. 

     Seven films. Seven fucking films into a horror franchise about a homicidal doll should be this fucking unique and refreshing. I know a lot of you wrote the series off by now, but this goes into some uncharted territory. It plays up the mystery angle again, like the first one and Curse to be fair, and it creates some tension. Again, this is part 7! It absolutely works! Somehow it made it work!

     The film can’t help but falls into some standard clichés that are trapping of the genre, like you know who’s going to die, or who’s a villainous character, all that stuff. But the film is smart enough to realize that, and just embraces its trappings instead of being embarrassed by them. 

     The smartest thing Cult manages to pull off that the humor of the film has to come from Chucky himself, not the other characters. Rather the cheesy humor that put a lot of people off of entries like Bride of Chucky. It juxtaposes itself incredibly against the unbelievable amount of gore. Its been awhile since I saw a horror movie just love its buckets of blood. 

     The genius part of the movie comes in the third act that I can’t bare to reveal because I don’t want to rob you guys of the sheer lunacy that it has. But if you put thought into what the film shows you, then holy shit is it ever terrifying (while also laughing my ass off, not going to lie). If you’re at all a fan of Chucky, then you owe it to yourself to see this one. I know I already can’t wait for the next one. 


Kingsmen: The Golden Circle (2017) Review

     The first Kingsmen film came along as one hell of a surprise; an exciting, funny love letter to the classic James Bond films that came before it. 

     Now we have the follow up, Kingsmen: The Golden Circle which sees the headquarters of the titular spy agency destroyed by the villainous Poppy (Julianne Moore) who wants to poison the world’s marijuana smokers and ransom the antidote. Eggsy (Taron Egerton) seeks help from the American branch known as The Statesman, run by Champ (Jeff Bridges). Soon though, Eggsy will discover the truth about one of his fallen comrades.

     I’m sure now more than ever, that any follow up to The Kingsman was sure to suffer by comparison. The original just kind of crept up on you, eventually winning you over with its humpr, charm, and ridiculously over the top action. 

     The Golden Circle isn’t a terrible film by any means, but it is a tad bit underwhelming when stood side by side with the first one. Its a bit of a design flaw for a sequel on that there are no real surprises this time around. Not as refreshing as the original. 

     One of the weaker aspects is the villain Poppy. Julianne Moore is a fine actress, but she’s not given much in way of personality or anything to do really. Samuel L. Jackson’s Valentine in the first film was a parody of classic Bond villains, but he knew he was. Moore’s character plays it straight, but by doing so she comes off as bland. 

     Another crazy thing is The Statesmen themselves; they set up this fascinating agency, but don’t do much with it. An agent by the name of Tequila, played by Channing Tatum is criminally underused by the screenplay. He’s barely in it, but when he is in it, you love the dude. Same goes for Ginger played by Halle Barry, the woman tech genius. They were some hints that she might have experienced some sexism in her work, but its brushed aside, and that just frustrated me. 

     Now, there are some fun scenes to be had. The action still remains top notch, especially at the climax of the film, and there’s a sweet love story with Eggsy and his girlfriend who is the Princess of Sweden. But the best, truly the best part is the subplot with Elton John. Thinking about, he has the best character arc of anyone else in the picture. Film is totally worth watching for it and I can’t bare to reveal anything more about it. 

     While I laughed and was fairly entertained by this installment of the Kingsmen I felt myself wanting a bit more; from The Statesmen to the villain to fucking Elton John for God’s sake, the movie did too good of a job setting these great ideas that just came up short. For some not by much, for others it may not be worth it. 

Don’t Be Upset That Twin Peaks Ended, Be Joyous That It Happened. 

     On September 3rd, Twin Peaks: The Return ended its run with a two part finale. I’m still reeling from so I will do my best to keep some sort of sanity in my thoughts. I sense that a lot of people royally pissed off over how it all transpired; the events, the use of the characters, the explicitly unanswered questions, just take your pick, its all valid. 

     If you find yourself upset, ask yourself this: 

     Do you even know David Lynch?

     The last two episodes (especially the second one) come off as some sort of fever dream that quickly spiraled into a nightmare. This is Lynch at his purest, most surrealist that he’s been in years. From the likes of Lost Highway to Inland Empire this is what the fimmmaker has always done; the dropped plot points, the strayed characterizations, I mean this is pretty common. 

     The final episode, to get back on track here, is a surrealist masterpiece. Based on that one viewing, I legitimately have no idea where to start to make sense. No matter though, when it comes to David Lynch I have come to learn that if you don’t know how to feel, just go with the music and the images. The use of negative space, think of the car scene at its climax, along with the lingering shots, create such a sense of unease, almost as of we’re descending into Hell. I feel a sense of loss, but I can’t even begin to tell you why. The ending just feels sad and open ended and that has always been Lynch’s style. 

     I do have a theory about what it could mean, but that requires some spoilers. 
     Based on the last few episodes, I believe that the events of this series of Twin Peaks all transpire in Audrey’s coma. I am fairly confident that in one of the early episodes it was mentioned that she was in a coma, but in a throwaway line. And then with her dance at the Roadhouse it became pretty apparent. But again that’s my immediate reaction. 

     What does it all mean, this new Twin Peaks? I believe it’s about the fact that you can never go home again. It just isn’t the same. And when you do go back, be prepared to face the demons you left behind. If not then all you’ll experience is the bleakest void imaginable. 

     This ending is going to stay with me for awhile. I knew that since the beginning. 

Spider Man: Homecoming (2017) Review

     I remember the first time I saw Sam Rami’s Spider-Man back in 2002. The wow factor, the close proximity to the comics, even the joy that the movie made me feel. 

     Well, 15 years, six films, and 3 Spider- Men later I can say enthusiastically that the films finally got lighthearted and humorous which was something the franchise was sorely lacking. 

     Its been about two months since the events of Captain America: Civil War and Peter Parker (Tom Holland) is eagerly waiting for his next mission from Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) while trying to balance high school and being a friendly neighborhood superhero. 

     After foiling a robbery attempt by the crew of Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton) a former government contractor, Spider-Man is put to the test if he’s actually cut out to be a hero. 

     I believe its safe to assume that a lot of fans of Spider-Man have mild reservations about giving this movie their time and money consider how underwhelming the last few entries were. And that’s fair. As someone who doesn’t mind seeing the same character on screen, I just always hope for a different take or story to make it worth my while. 

     And holy shit, I got that here. 

     First off, the origin story has been reduced to a couple of lines. Parker is 15 years old and still in high school. Like for the entire movie. A lot of the movie feels like (because it is) a high school movie that took some inspiration from John Hughes. They even have a school dance (a Homecoming dance…) in the flick, for God’s sake!

     Tom Holland as Spider-Man is the best interpretation of the character I have seen yet on film. Some of the movies gloss over or just plain ignore the fact the Spider-Man is just a child. He really should have no business being a superhero. Holland manages to play the awkwardness of the character to such perfection, that I accepted him readily as the character more than Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield. Might have to do with the focus being on high school, but it was easy going for me. This is the first time in a movie where I actually felt scared for Parker, where in the third act especially, I saw the boy’s fear in his eyes, trying to be brave, but he’s still just a 15 year old kid. 

     The true revelation of the film is Michael Keaton as The Vulture. This should have been a thankless, bullshit paycheck role, oh but not with Keaton. He infuses his character of Toomes with humor, sheer villainy, pathos and humanity into his role that any lesser actor would have slept through. The man in many respects was too good for the role. I mean, its the fucking Vulture! He was B-level villain, and that’s being much too kind. Every single damn time the man just commanded my attention. I have to refrain myself from too many spoilers, but you’ll know the scenes I’m referring to because you won’t be able to blink. 

     I was certain that the Marvel Universe references would be a distracting nuisance, but it fit seamlessly into the story. Tony Stark felt organic, appearing appropriately enough that it doesn’t become less of a Spider-Man movie instead of Iron Man 4. It helps to know the players, but its more self contained as a story than other Marvel films. 

     Homecoming had a lot of hurdles to get through in my eyes, but it damn well got over them. It’s so different, so humorous, that when the credits rolled, I laughed out loud and had a smile on my face as I went home. 

     Welcome home, Spider-Man. 

Baby Driver (2017) Review

     Edgar Wright is a god damn artist. The writer-director of Baby Driver has made other incredible films in the past, but here. Here. The man has ascended to the entirely other level. What should’ve been standard genre fare has been delivered to us as one of the best films of the year, bar none. 

     After suffer from a terrible car accident as a child that left him with tinnitus, Baby (Ansel Elgort) is the best getaway driver out there. Using music to drown out the ringing in his ears, he masterfully navigates the streets to pay off his debt to Doc (Kevin Spacey). But with one more job left and a beautiful waitress (Lily James) giving him purpose, he quickly learns that there are no clean getaways. 

     Edgar Wright has always been the kind of fimmaker who both embraces and skews the conventions of any given genre be it Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, or Scott Pilgrim vs. The World the man’s love of filmmaking is embedded into every single frame of the films he makes. 

     I can’t recall any recent film where the editing is so meticulously put together to the soundtrack of the movie. I mean everything from gunshots, to revving engines to even the actor’s body movements are all precisely timed to the soundtrack. It just manages to suck you in and without even trying, gets you to focus on the story’s unfolding of the events. 

     All of this shit, as fucking incredible as it is, wouldn’t mean anything if it wasn’t for the acting that’s on display here. Jamie Foxx is subtly terrifying as an unhinged member of the crew. Spacey just effortlessly commands every single scene he’s in. I don’t know another actor that comes off so confident. 

     Esgort’s Baby comes through perfectly written, believable, sweet especially in scenes with James’s Debora but the relationship that gave the movie an unexpected depth and warm heart was Baby’s relationship with his foster father Joseph played by CJ Jones. It was this storyline that made me root for Baby and for him to ride off into the sunset. 

     Maybe a lot of people won’t care that the movie is a throwback to the 70s line of heist films, but no one can deny that the movie is thrilling, funny as hell, and the best car chases I’ve seen in years. And you can actually see them too! No shaky cam bullshit. The film is fresh and original and I need that soundtrack in my life. 

Cars 3 (2017) Review

     Over this past decade I have actually come to have an affection for the Cars series (thanks to my nephew). Yes, even the much reviled Cars 2. But now we’ve come full circle with Cars 3 and I can see it being a bittersweet entry for the fans who grew up with Lighting McQueen. 

     Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) seems to be on his last legs. With a new racer named Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer) who is just plain faster than McQueen, causes him to question whether he can still cut it in today’s racing. With help from Cruz (Cristela Alonzo) a new trainer to help him back to the top. 

     I am such a sucker for the apprentice becomes the teacher stories, especially in franchises. The story has come full circle (hilariously) as McQueen trains his trainer. 

     Gone this time around is the grand scope of the previous film, and a return ro the small, intimate nature that gave the original its charm. Its more retrospective, even a little sad as Doc (Paul Newman) is referenced throughout the film and it brought the real theme of time fleeting. 

     Speaking of Paul Newman, Cars 3 did evoke some memories of The Color of Money a sequel to The Hustler. Now, Lightning McQueen was never disgraced like Fast Eddie Felson was, but the passing of the torch was reminiscent of it.  

     This is by no means a perfect film and Pixar has obviously made much better films, but the movie is light, inoffensive, and quite frankly, a little deeper than it had any business being. I finished the movie with a smile and that’s a lot more than most films this summer.