Ready Player One (2018) Review

If you were born in the 80s, then pretty much director Steven Spielberg raised you. Everything from Raiders of the Lost Ark to E.T., to movies he produced like Back to the Future and The Goonies the man helped to craft 80s pop culture.

Ready Player One is an ode to that wonderful era from things like movies, music and especially video games. It’s a buffet of pop culture that may seem to be overcrowded, but isn’t overwhelming. It’s actually quite sweet, and Spielberg’s best film since Minority Report.

In the year 2045, 18 year old Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan) lives in an impoverished area named The Stacks. He dreams of a better life for himself and escapes into a virtual reality called The Oasis, where you can be whoever you want to be. The creator of the Oasis, James Halliday (Mark Rylance) passes away and leaves a will detailing a contest; whoever solves the clues and obtains the 3 keys, wins the Oasis.

Along with other players, Art3mis (Olivia Cooke) and Aech (Lana Waithe), the race is on to obtain the keys before the head of a cooperation (Ben Mendelsohn) gets his hands on it and destroys it.

If the plot sounds like it’s Willy Wonka meets The Matrix that’s because it totally is! And man is it so much fun to watch! Knowing Spielberg, the film is vibrant and stunning to behold. I can’t remember the last time I was immersed in a cinematic world.

The acting is on point for every single performance, but the scene stealer is Mark Rylance as Halliday. It was known that Spielberg wanted Gene Wilder to play the part, bringing the Willy Wonka motif full circle, but I can’t imagine a better performance. It so layered, nuanced, and even heartbreaking that he becomes the heart of the movie. Rylance is now not only one of my favorite actors now, but he’s one of the best actors out there.

If you have a casual knowledge of Spielberg’s films, you know that John Williams has composed the score to almost every film that he’s made. Due to schedule conflicts, Williams couldn’t score the movie, being replaced by Back to the Future composer Alan Silvestri. Jesus Christ this is his best score since Forrest Gump. He keeps the music pumping during the action, throws some cues from his earlier work that doesn’t distract at all. It felt like Halliday chose this music for his easter egg hunt.

Steven Spielberg has made some incredible movies as of late, but he has veered away from the rousing popcorn flicks that he built his career on. I have never seen such an amazing return to form, and it just proves that the man still has a thing or two to show us.

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